an archive of lesson plans

Author: Katherine Pérez

F20 Online: Social Media

Conversation Class Lesson Summary

Language Resident Name:

Maria Segura

Maria Glukhova

Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez

Day and Date:

Week 3-4, Fall 2020

Language and Level (intermediate or advanced class):

All

Class theme/topics discussed:

Social Media

How did you structure the class?

Warm up questions

  • Would you rather have everything on your phone right now (browsing history, photos, etc.) made public to anyone who searches your name or never use a cell phone again?
  • Would you rather never run out of battery power for whatever phone and tablet you own or always have free Wi-Fi wherever you go?
  • Short poll: Do you…
  • Check your phone as soon as you wake up (Consulter son smartphone dès son réveil)
  • Use different devices to watch/read stuff at the same time (Lire des informations ou regarder du contenu (photos ou vidéos) sur plusieurs écrans simultanément.)
  • Check your phone every 10mn just in case (Consulter son smartphone toutes les 10 minutes au cas où.)
  • Reply to every text in less than 10mn (Répondre à chaque message en moins de 10 minutes)
  • Texting and driving at the same time (Utiliser son smartphone au volant)

> Do a quick graph with the answers to show how students use their phones/social media/technology.

General discussion questions

  • Some people “collect” friends in social networks. Is it possible to have 500 friends in real life?
  • What do you think about social media? 
  • How would you define them? 
  • What types of social media do you know/use? 
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of social media?

Activity 1 – Carmen & Twitter

  • Carmen: show the video. Ask students, in pairs, to focus on one of the characters: either Stromae or the bird. How do they change throughout the song?
  • Compare with the original opera Carmen. Quels éléments linguistiques, musicaux, etc. Stromae emprunte-t-il à « Carmen » ? À votre avis, pourquoi Stromae a-t-il fait ce choix ? Que pensez-vous de ce clip ? Atteint-il les objectifs supposés ?

Activity 2 – Create your own social media (cf Katty SP LR 2019)

  • Made-up social media platform: After giving an example of  a social media platform a friend and I created, in groups of three, students have to create new social platforms using either of the criteria provided in the table (they can also add new ones). They have to consider three different categories: Topic, target audience and functions. Also, they have to create a name and a logo for their platforms

Activity 3 – Social media and social movements

Article on how social media affected the “Printemps Arabe” back in 2011. Could be the starting point of a discussion on the impact of social media on social movements: 

  • Do they think social media can be used for more than fun?
  • How different are they from more traditional ways of communicating information? What are their specific characteristics? (direct access/easy to share with a lot of people/younger target audience)
  • What are the risks?

Activity 4 [For Rus] – VKontakte

Go to vk.com and create your own VK account! (you can talk about the structure, differences with FB, copyright..)

F20 Online: Hobbies

Conversation Class Lesson Summary

Language Resident Name:

Maria Segura

Maria Glukhova

Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez

Day and Date:

Week 3-4, Fall 2020

Language and Level (intermediate or advanced class):

All

Class theme/topics discussed:

Hobbies

How did you structure the class?

Warm up – what can you do with this object? (//Rosina SP LR 2015)

The LR writes a word on the board (eg: lamp). Then, they divide the group into two teams. Each team has to come up with the greatest amount of “crazy” ways in which a certain object may be used. Online, the chat could be used, or a padlet where each student/team would write down their words as they come up with them.

General discussion questions

  • What is a hobby?
  • What is your hobby?
  • Why do people have hobbies?
  • Why did you start your hobby?
  • Does your hobby influence your choice of friends?
  • Which hobbies are the most popular in your country?
  • Did you have any hobbies when you were a child?
  • Can you think of any hobbies which are popular with children and adults?
  • Do you think a hobby is different from a sport?

Activity 1 – Lost on a deserted island

  • Each student is asked to write down two/three objects that represent something they enjoy doing (it doesn’t have to be realistic handy objects eg could be a swimming pool, the ocean, a horse) —> hobbies. The class is divided in two/three groups. Each student presents to the rest of their group the object and explains why it represents them. 

— Variant 1.

  • Once every student has described and explained their item, the class is divided in smaller groups. They are now on a deserted island and only have the objects they had chosen with them. They must work together to improve their chance of survival by combining all the objects of the group in fun and innovative ways. 
  • To wrap-up the activity, ask the students to discuss in their small groups or in pairs one of their hobbies. 

— Variant 2.

  • Students draw 2 objects instead of just one, and then they exchange pictures without seeing them *online, we could probably use a folder?*. 
  • Students pick 2 pictures that someone else drew. Their task is to come up with ideas of how these two objects would help them to survive on a deserted island. 

Activity 2 – Creating a club, American campus style

  • Students who have very different kinds of hobbies are paired up/put in groups of 3. Together, they must create a club that they would present to the next Turf dinner. The club must be a mix of their  two hobbies plus another element that I randomly gave them (tea, pets, knitting…). They need to fill in a chart with information about the club and prepare a presentation for the Turf dinner. 
  • Fake Turf dinner: in turn, each group presents their club to the rest of the class. The other students must find, with their partner(s), at least one question to ask to each group.

Activity 3 – Jeopardy

  • In small groups, students have to make small presentations on a hobby’s’ categorie, such as, sports, music, audiovisual, cooking. They should include fun & interesting facts about these categories in relation to the countries where and people who speak the target language. For example: Soccer is the most popular sport in Latin America; Guillermo del Toro has won over 10 awards. 
  • The instructor creates a game on https://jeopardylabs.com/ using info students had mentioned during the class, diving the game into the same categories. 
  • This activity would work better if the presentations and the game are done on 2 separate classes. If you have the presentations on a Tuesday and you play the game on a Thursday to make sure all the questions you include in the game are going to be based on information your students already know from the previous class.

Activity 4 – Hobbies charades

  • Using vocabulary reviewed during the class, on zoom, the instructor sends a private message with a hobbie they had mentioned in class (ex: wine tasting) to a student. The student pantomimes the activity mentioned and the class guesses. The student who guesses gets to pantomime next and so on.

Extra activity  – Guess who

  • Part 1: At the beginning of the class ask students 10 questions about hobbies ( Who likes cooking/baking? What do you like to cook/bake?). The instructor asks students to reply the yes/no question using the “thumbs up” icon on zoom. Whoever has clicked the icon has to write down on the chat what it is that they like to do (Baking cakes).  *Check if it’s possible to clear the chat on zoom”
    • Do you like playing sports? Which one?
    • Do you like cooking? What do you  like to cook?
    • Do you like baking? What do you like to bake?
    • Do you like arts and crafts? What do you like to do?
    • Do you like watching films? What genre?
    • Do you play any instrument? Which one?
    • Do you like reading? Which one is your favorite book?
    • Do you like listening to music? What genre?
    • What’s your favorite thing to do? (If previous questions don’t provide enough info)
  • Part 2: At the end of the class, the whole class plays guess who. The instructor randomly chooses one student and the rest of the class starts asking questions to guess who is the chosen student. Repeat a few different times
    • Do you like ball sports/extreme sports/water sports/ outdoor sports?
    • Do you like savory/sweet/hot/cold/spicy/ food?
    • Do you use thread/paint/pencil/paper/etc?
    • Do you like action/comedy/crime/drama/fantasy/historical/horror/thriller/romance/etc.?
    • Is the instrument you play a woodwind/percussion/string/brass/keyboard?

Extra activity version 2 – Guess the sport

  • Display on your screen/Send to your students a picture with about 20 sports. Either the instructor or one student chooses a sport from the display. The rest of the class has to guess which sport was chosen by asking questions to gradually get rid of the different sports. Specify that they have to ask broad questions like: 
    • Do you like ball sports/extreme sports/water sports/ outdoor sports?
    • Do you like savory/sweet/hot/cold/spicy/ food?
    • Do you use thread/paint/pencil/paper/etc?
    • Do you like action/comedy/crime/drama/fantasy/historical/horror/thriller/romance/etc.?
    • Is the instrument you play a woodwind/percussion/string/brass/keyboard?

ES S20 INT/ADV Traveling

Language Resident: Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez (Credit to Marie Segura)

Class theme/topic discussed : Travel

Goal of the class 

  • Practice vocabulary related to traveling and means of transport
  • Get to know popular touristic destinations in Spanish speaking places

Class structure

  • Warm up: Questions (Do you like traveling? What does traveling mean to you? What are the advantages and disadvantages of traveling? Do you think traveling is a form of education? What places have you been to? Would you like to travel on your own?
  • Input:  Story about one of my trips (emphasis on means of transport and activities I did there)
  • Activity 1: What type of traveller are you? Students have been given a free trip but they can’t choose where to go. In pairs, students fill in a chart explaining what type of traveller they are and rank a list of things they like to do the most when traveling.
  • Activity 2: Organize the trip. Organize a surprise trip for another pair of students using their preferences. Each pair of students receives another pair’s list of preferences. Now they have to organize a surprise trip, by first choosing a destination (4 destinations are proposed on a handout with the main activities you can do there but they can also choose another Spanish-speaking destination and look up for information online) and then deciding on different aspects of the trip: length of the trip, means of transport, housing, activities organized there. When they’re done, students pick 10 items out of a list that they would pack for this trip. They can add things if they want to. 
  • Activity 3: Presenting the trip/Receiving the Gift. Each group presents the trip they organized to the rest of the class (and especially to the group who receives it who has to react)
  • Activity 4: Customs role-play. Students are on their way to their destinations. In small groups they have to recreate getting to the airport, checking their luggage, going through customs and everything people usually have to do when in the airport.
  • Activity 5: Filling a complaint. Students come up with a complaint about something going wrong with their trip (the flight got delayed, the airline lost their luggage, the place they where staying at wasn’t clean enough, etc.) 
  • Activity 6: COVID-19. ¿How has traveling changed since the virus started spreading? What measures have been taken by airlines/airports? Do you think this is going to have a more permanent effect on traveling in the future? How are airports and airplanes going to look like after the pandemic is under control? 

Resources used

Reflection: What worked/did not work? How can it be improved?

  • The class worked okay. Trying to use the handout was hard because of zoom, but after trying to make the questions in a more conversational way, it worked okay. Because only 2 students joined the class, we only did the first 3 activities.

Annex

  • Traveler’s handout
Viajero-handout.pages

ES S20 INT/ADV Literature/Idioms

Language Resident: Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez

Class theme/topic discussed : Literature & Idioms

Goal of the class 

  • To practice literature related vocabulary
  • To become familiar with Spanish speaking authors and popular titles
  • To recognize common idioms

Class structure

  • Warm-up: Questions about reading taste & habits (Do you like reading? How often do you read? What was the last book you read? Who is your favorite author? Which one is your favorite book? Do you have any favorite character? Do you have any reading routine?) 
  • Activity 1: I show students the book covers of 6 Spanish literature classics. After randomly reading  the back cover of the books, students have to match them to the book cover and come up with a title for the books. At the end students comment on which book seems the most interesting for them.
  • Activity 2:  Santiago en 100 palabras: I show students a Micro-stories. After reading 2 examples,  in groups, using a template provided by the organization in charge of this contest, they have to write a micro-story.  (https://www.santiagoen100palabras.cl/web/#libros)
  • Activity 3: Don’t judge a book by its cover. Students have a list of idioms commonly used in Spanish. In groups they have to guess the meaning of each idiom. I explain what the real meaning of each idiom is before jumping onto the next activity.
  • Activity 4: Using story cubes,  in groups, the class comes up with a short story where they put the idiom in context.
  • (extra) Activity 5: Childhood texts stories. I tell students a story about how this children story that marked me greatly when I was a kid. They do the same. 
  • (extra) Activity 6: Students are randomly assigned one of the idioms we have been using all along the class. They have to write the idiom for their classmates to guess, but only using emojis.
  • (extra) Activity 7: Students watch a video where you have to guess new idioms based on emoji phrases.

Resources used

  • PPT
  • Youtube
  • Story cubes
  • “Santiago en 100 palabras” handout

Reflection: What worked/did not work? How can it be improved?

  • The class worked well. Even though we didn’t go pass activity 3, they seemed quite engaged when reading and commenting on the books’ blurb.

Annex

Santiago en 100 palabras handout

S100p-¿Y-cómo-es-el-cuento

S100p-Periodista-por-un-día

ES S20 INT/ADV End of Term Report

Language Resident: Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez

Class theme/topic discussed: End of term report

Goal of the class:

  • To look back on the year and prepare some goals for the upcoming year.
  • To practice past tenses, conditional
  • To  exchange information about the future to be able to hypothesize 

Class structure

  • Warm-up: Students discuss  whether they know or the meaning of the following words: Goals, balance, accomplishments, to achieve a goal, to be thankful.
  • Activity 1: Students discuss the following questions: What goals people usually propose for themselves? Can you think of 2 or 3 goals related to these areas of life? (Health, work, money, family, couples, studies, friendship.
  • Activity 2:  Year’s balance/ recap: in pairs students complete each other’s chart of memorable things that happened to them during whatever period of time you are talking about. Then they share. (In case the conversation his going to slowly, use the questions in the annex) 
  • Activity 3: (cred. Marie Segura & Mikiko Saigo) New Year’s Resolutions: (This activity takes place during a family dinner/dinner with friends) Students are separated in groups. In turn, they roll the dice and discover their new year’s resolution. Then, they have to convince skeptical friends/family that they are actually going to keep their resolution this year and to explain why it is so important to them and how are you going to do it.
  • Activity 4: Students become fortune tellers and predict each other’s future with the help of the story cubes and some images. They will make predictions about health, success in work and education, and love. 

Resources used

  • Resolutions sheet
  • PPT

Reflection: What worked/did not work? How can it be improved?

  • As the last class of the semester, it worked pretty well. For activity 2, if it’s an online class, it’s better to have the questions in hand.

Annex

  • Activity 1 Table: 
SaludTrabajoDineroFamiliaParejasEstudiosAmistades
Ej.: comer más sano





  • Activity 2 Chart: 

Cosas divertidas que hice: …
Algo nuevo que aprendí: …
Gente interesante que conocí: …
Lugares que visité: …
Algo que nunca olvidaré: …
Algo de lo que estoy orgulloso/a: …

  • Extra questions for Activity 2: 

¿Cuáles han sido los momentos más destacados?

¿Qué cosas nuevas has probado durante este año?

¿Cuáles han sido tus momentos más felices?

¿Qué has aprendido durante este año?

¿Cuál ha sido tu mayor éxito personal? ¿Y cuál tu mayor éxito profesional?

¿Cuál ha sido el mayor aprendizaje sobre ti mismo?

¿Qué harías de forma diferente?

¿Qué quieres mantener durante el próximo año? ¿Qué te gustaría cambiar en el año nuevo?

  • Resolutions sheet

ES S20 INT/ADV Music

Language Resident Name: Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez

Class theme/topic discussed: Music taste and music genres

Goal of the class 

  • To work on music related vocabulary
  • Learn about music culture in Spanish speaking countries

Class’ structure

  • Warm-up: Introductory questions about music taste and word cloud on music instruments. 
  • Input: Small presentation on Cueca. It includes instruments usually used to play that music, exponents and dance (how is it and how the costumes look like).
  • Activity 1: Students choose between different Spanish speaking countries music styles. They have to make a small a presentation and include the same information as in the presentation the teacher gave (cumbia, ranchera, flamenco, rumba, timba, tango, salsa, merengue) 
  • Activity 2: Students describe a picture in which writing and music is related and discuss whether music should also be considered poetry. Students receive fragments of different reggaeton songs and poems and have to distinguish which are which. They listen to all of them, read as if they were poems and share their results
  • Activity 3: Each group of students works with one of the fragments which corresponded to reggaeton songs and have to invent a new fragment. We listen to the songs and I pause them right before their fragment comes, so that they sing it. 
  • Extra Activity 1: Discussing the content of some reggaeton songs and their cultural significance: Yo perreo sola – Bad Bunny
  • Extra activity 2: I play different songs linked with the styles they talked about in their presentations. Students have to guess the music genre. 

Resources used

  • Youtube: 
  • PPT

Reflection: What worked/did not work? How can it be improved?

  • Students enjoyed the discussions at the very beginning, but doing the zoom presentation was a bit hard. When talking about online classes, it’s better to avoid those “group research projects” because some students may just be on their phones or have a harder time doing group research.
  • As an extra activity we created a playlist in Spotify and I’ve heard students commenting on the songs, which is fun and engaging for them.

Annex

ES F19 INT/ADV: Social Media

SOCIAL-MEDIA-IntAdv

Spanish Conversation Class – Intermediate/Advanced

Language Resident Name:  Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez

Class theme/topic discussed 

  • Social media

Goal of the class 

  • Practice vocabulary related to social media
  • Compare and contrast different situations usually found in social media
  • Create new social media platforms 

Class’ structure

  • Attendance (2 min)
  • Warm up:  What do you know about social networks? What words come up to your mind: Students create a Menti Word cloud with words they would use to define social media. Most interesting words are chosen and discussed by everyone: Would you use this word as well? Why? Where in social networks do we see it reflected the most? (10-15 min)
  • Input: Video + Survey: I show students a video that talks about uses, advantages and disadvantages of social network uses. Followed by a discussion: Do you agree with this? How many of you do this kind of things when on the internet? We also talk about a survey that shows which are the most common social platforms used in some Hispanic countries. They discuss and compare to the US (5-7 min)
  • Activity 1: Toteking – “Redes Sociales” music video. Students watch half of the video and, as they are watching it, they have to check at least 2 critiques the singers makes to social media. Afterwards, they get three short statements from they just heard. In groups they discuss they statements to finally report their discussions to the class (10-15 min)
  • Activity 2: Made-up social media platform: After giving an example of  a social media platform my sister and I created, in groups of three, students have to create new social platforms using either of the criteria provided in the table (they can also add new ones). They have to consider three different categories: Topic, target audience and functions. Also, they have to create a name and a logo for their platforms (15-20 min)

Resources used

Reflection: What worked/did not work? How can it be improved?

  • I did this class at the beginning of the year so students felt more comfortable working in groups at first. For Activity 2 you have to be careful not to take that much time giving an example about what they have to create because the activity itself already takes a long time. They had a lot of fun with activity two and you can even do a jury like activity in a following class where they all have to grade each other’s platforms

Annex

  • Social networks table
Categoría Público Funciones
Citas
Empleo
Noticias
Compra y venta Lifestyle Educación
Comida
OTROS
Ancianos
Adultos +30
Jóvenes Niños Animales
OTROS
Fotos y videos
Transmitir en vivo
Juegos
Mensajería directa Música
OTROS 
  • Grading Table
Grupo N



Idea



Nombre



Logo



ES F19 INT: How do they look like?

Language Resident Name:  Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez

Class theme/topic discussed: People’s physical appearance.

Goal of the class: Learn vocabulary to describe someone’s physical appearance.

Class’ structure

  • Attendance (2 min)
  • Warm up: In small groups, students brainstorm words related to physical description. They also answer: What do you think about when talking about physical appearance? How would you describe your closest friend? How would you describe yourself? (3-5 min)
  • Input: I show students a picture of my friends and I give a mini description of almost each one of them. Students have to give a mini description of 2 people in the picture, who I haven’t described yet. (5-7 min)
  • Activity 1:  “Una mujer fantástica” trailer: Students watch the trailer of the movie and describe the main character’s appearance (height, hair, age, etc) in small groups. Then, they whole class comment on the description and add more traits to have a more detailed description of the  movie characters’ (5-7 min)  
  • Activity 2: In pairs, students describe each other. One by one, students get a paper with a classmate’s name written on it. They have to give a description of that classmate so that the rest of the class guess who are they taking about (emphasize that the descriptions have to be hard enough for the class to not guess immediately right after) (5-7 min)
  • Activity 3: Detective role play: Each student get a picture of someone who “has gone missing”. One of the student is a detective and the other one has to tell how does the person missing looks like. The “detective” draws the person who is being described. Both students get to be a “detective” using one different picture each. After having done this, each group describes their partners’ picture and we all get to compare and see how accurate the description was (15-20 min)

Resources used

Reflection: What worked/did not work? How can it be improved?

  • The activities worked okay. Activity Nº2 worked fine because the class was small, but it could also be done with smaller groups in a larger class. The topic could have been developed in a bit more depth with a more complex activity to make it a bit more challenging.

ES F19 ADV: Migration

Language Resident Name:  Katherine Pérez Gutiérrez

Class theme/topic discussed: Migration.

Goal of the class:

  • Talk about current immigration affairs (both on a personal and general level)
  • Practice the use of past tenses (preterite & preterite imperfect) 
  • Practice storytelling (1st & 3rd person)

Class’ structure

  • Attendance (2 min)
  • Warm-up: Students and I go over the talk we went to on the previous class (“Commonsense Racism and Latin American Mobility in the Time of Trump”)  and comment a bit on what the speaker said.  In small groups, they start discussing: What where some common phrases used by Trump? What group/s of people is he usually referring to when talking about migrants? Why do you think people leave their countries? Which ones are the largest groups of migrants in the US? Do you have any idea about immigration in other places, like Chile?  (5-7 min)
  • Input: 1) Students look up on their phone where do people who migrate to Chile come from. After discussing their findings, I showed them a video about a Foundation in Santiago. During the video they had to answer: When was the foundation created and by whom?Around  how many students and volunteers where participating there? What was the role of the more advanced students?

2) I also talk about how my experience working in that foundation was. (5-7 min)

  • Activity 1:  In groups, students tell each other wether or not they have had any experience related to migration, and, if so, they share it to one another. Afterwards each group share their stories with the whole class, but each student has to tell one of their classmate’s story. (10-15 min)
  • Activity 2: Aporofobia (fear and rejection towards poverty and poor people): Students look up the meaning of that word and comment on it. They have to answer: Have you seen an example of that in the U.S? Where? When? Does that sound similar to what I’ve told you about Chile? (5-7 min)
  • Acrivity 3: “Linguistic barrier”: I read a paragraph from a news article about Haitians in Chile and how language is a barrier for them as well. Students comment on that as well, comparing and contrasting U.S. situation with Chile’s one (5-7 min)
  • Activity 4: Migration explained with kitties: I play a video that explains Central American migrants situation with kitties. In groups, students answer some questions related to the video:  Why are they using cats to explain the migratory situation? Why do Central American migrants travel in caravans? What are some of the issues they face along the way? Mention 3 reasons why they leave their countries. (10-15 min)

Resources used

Reflection: What worked/did not work? How can it be improved?

  • .The class worked really well in spite of how sensitive the topic can be. If you emphasize that they should not feel pushed to share anything they don’t want to, as long as you pay attention to how students are feeling, the class should work just fine.

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